Summary of two outside sources relating to research paper

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How to make a slave
How to Make a Slave” rotates around race and fatherhood, and the unforeseen ending made it one of the most enticing reads. This story that demonstrates slavery had a longer and more diverse history covering many years in the colonial period as opposed to the nineteenth century equally important is the fact that in this early period it extended to the Middle Colonies affecting many people across the globe (How to make a slave, 187). This story focusses on basic facts about slavery and elimination in a school setting where classmates cheer me when I’m specifically describe Douglas’ most famous line, ‘’you have seen how a man was made a slave; you shall see how a slave was made a man.”
The racial discrimination comes out evident since one of my classmates says forget his name in a few years but instead remember that his skin was so dark that me and my friend were left with no choice than to refer to him as Congo explaining how he could have gouged out his eyes and eventually other boys break the legs of their master amputating their arms and in the event someone curls their fingers to become a claw twisting the balls of his master and all cup their crotch in pain before bursting out in laughter and as I walk to home with Douglass sombrely staring out of my back pocket I wish black history had some of its parts funny(How to make a slave, 187).
The story unfolds explaining how one was captured on a wiretap of FBI of Martin Luther King where he is found in a hotel making love and yells just at the right moment, ‘’I’m fucking for God’’ the funniness is realised later but it turns out clear that the messenger is not the most important thing here but the message is and the message in question bears repeating. This confuses the girlfriend making her open her mouth seemingly responding, but she keeps staring not even thinking. I realize this is a conversation for another person since this one is white and does not talk about race and doesn’t even see race having said that she had taught herself to make judgement of individuals by their character or deeds she is, therefore, post-racial but I just thought she is stupid and being the first one she knew she thinks I’m stupid as well, but we both seek to find smarter opinions in the wake of time (How to make a slave, 188).
As the story proceeds, it is clear that I have the notion that white people were and will never cease to be racists and she concedes that if I had children her stereotypes would be preferable to mine. (How to make a slave, 188). And the long story proceeds.
Gerald Walker is an English Assistant Professor at Bridgewater State College in Massachusetts. He joined the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he worked as a Teaching/Writing person and James A. Michener Fellow. The first source is by John Jeremiah Sullivan; Timothy Richard Aubry; Wendy Brenner; John H Culver; Kristin Dombek and is published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt of Boston. The second source is an issue of Southern Humanities Review Published by Auburn University in conjunction with the Southern Humanities Council. I will use to sources to summarize the story and to complete the research paper.