Environmental Problems Caused by the Overconsumption of Meat

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Environmental Problems Caused by the Overconsumption of Meat
Brown, Paul and Linda D. Cameron. “What can be done to reduce overconsumption?” Ecological Economics 32 (2000): 27-41. Document.
Summary: Brown ad Linda look at the problem of overconsumption from an individual standpoint, presenting the challenges encountered in the identification of overconsumption and techniques to be applied to reduce the trend. The authors use present literature review to point out important issues that need further empirical research and acknowledge the significant that environmentalists, economists, and other disciplines can make to contribute to a reduction in the consumption of meat.
Evaluation: The authors critically discuss the issues they deem to be key in decreasing the consumption of meat. They also focus on providing assistance to researchers and health professionals in coming up with effective intervention techniques to meet their goals.
Reflection: I will benefit remarkably from using this source to identify the relationship between overconsumption of meat and the techniques that can be adopted to reduce the trend. Specifically, I will rely extensively on this source in the Discussion part to look at the productive techniques and those that are not.
Halden, Rolf U. and Kellogg J. Schwab. “Environmental Impact of Industrial Farm Animal Production.” 2008. Document. <http://www.ncifap.org/_images/212-4_envimpact_tc_final.pdf>.
Summary: Halden and Kellogg indicate the present practices of Ifap in the US are not sustainable and are leading to negative repercussions on local and regional resources such as water, air, and soil. At present, more than one million individuals depend on groundwater for consumption that is heavily contaminated with pollutants such as nitrogen, a condition that is wholly attributable to the excessive reliance on agricultural fertilizers and animal waste.
Evaluation: This is one of the sources that clearly points out the direct relationship between the use of animal products on natural resources. Nevertheless, the book is not up to date considering its year of publication and may not consider all the relevant information and, therefore, requires updating to include current trends.
Reflection: The source will be quite useful in making a comparison between the trends in the industry in 2008 and the current trends to establish whether there have been significant alterations to laws to deal with the current issues. It will be even more useful in the discussion part of the research.
Pimentel, David, et al. “Impact of a Growing Population on Natural Resources: The Challenge for Environmental Management.” Frontier: The International Journal of Study Abroad 13 (2012): 105-31. Document.
Summary: The authors argue that rapid increase in human numbers presents fresh difficulties in the management of the environment such an alarming increase in the production of pollutants. Additionally, there is a rapid degradation of such natural resources as land, water, energy, and biological resources leading to the reclamation of land from forests for farming thereby leading to deforestation.
Evaluation: This is one of the most important sources as it provides with very detailed information on the implications of human activities on natural resources such as land, water, energy as well as biological resources. The examples and diagrams used are quite detailed and self-explanatory.
Reflection: The authors critically evaluated the relationship between natural resources and the growing populations and the consequences of such growth. The source will be quite helpful in taking a deeper and closer look at the two factors leading to environmental changes, which is population increase and natural resources.
Tuomisto, Hanna and Avijit G. Roy. “Could cultured meat reduce the environmental impact of agriculture in Europe?” 8th International Conference on LCA in the Agri-Food Sector. Rennes, France, 2012. Document.
Summary: The source focuses on the possibility of meat to cut the Ecological implications of livestock production in developed nations in Europe. The source found that if cultured meat substituted all meat coming from the European Union, there would be a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions, land application and usage of water by nearly a half. Tuomisto and Avijit recommend that additional research is required to get the public to accept the new technology.
Evaluation: The source uses up to date data and other relevant information especially from the European Union in making its case in a way that is both persuasive and informative. The authors’ perception on the issue of meat is quite critical and thorough and provide some of the latest statistics to support their standpoint.
Reflection: The source will be of remarkable significance when evaluating the role of the European countries on the issue of the environmental problems caused by the overconsumption of meat.
More research and development is required before the product can be commercialised. Further effort is needed to gain public acceptance for this technology.
Walker, Polly, et al. “Public health implications of meat production and consumption.” Public Health Nutrition 8.4 (2005): 348-356. Document.
Summary: Walker carries out research into the relationship between the excessive consumption of meat and saturated fats in the United States and other developed countries and the role it plays in the increased incidence of chronic diseases such as diabetes. The author points out the most affected groups are the most affluent who consume foods with high concentrations of fertilizers and pesticides. There is the growing concern especially among members of the public concerning feed formulations that comprise animal tissues, arsenic as well as antibiotics and points out that it is very important for the health sector to get increasingly involved in the production of food for general consumption.
Evaluation: The source is important to the research for the fact that it identifies the role of healthcare professionals in the process of producing food for consumption by the public and their need to engage more actively in the process. The book, however, fails to specify the role and how the health professionals are to be involved in the process.
Reflection: The significance of the source in the research cannot be overlooked as it presents a fresh view of an area that most researchers prefer to ignore.It will, therefore, provide guidance on the consequent steps of the research and point out relevant information in the process.
UNEP. “Growing greenhouse gas emissions due to meat production.” 2012. Web. <http://www.unep.org/pdf/unep-geas_oct_2012.pdf>.
Summary: UNEP points that effects of reduced meat intake by human beings is an area that required additional research though it appears several advantages would result from a reduced intake of meat. Such a reduction, the organization adds, would considerably reduce the pressure on the ecology and lead to a cut in the emission of greenhouse gases. The organization recognizes even though getting the world to change its perception of meat consumption can be both challenging and time-consuming to achieve, the relevant stakeholders could be incentivized with a campaign indicating the benefits of a diet change, not only to the individual but also for the planet.
Evaluation: The book offers a fresh look at the relationship between the consumption of meat and its implication on the health of not only individuals but also the entire planet. It draws a very important connection between the emission of greenhouse gases and the rate of meat consumption. The author makes an endeavour, therefore, to stay relevant and provide statistically proven data and conclusions.
Reflection: The source is remarkable to me in the sense that it points me towards a direction that other sources are not able to identify. The book additionally has important information that will assist me in establishing the relationship between greenhouse gases and the consumption of meat.
Works Cited:
Brown, Paul and Linda D. Cameron. “What can be done to reduce overconsumption?” Ecological Economics 32 (2000): 27-41. Document.
Halden, Rolf U. and Kellogg J. Schwab. “Environmental Impact of Industrial Farm Animal Production.” 2008. Document. <http://www.ncifap.org/_images/212-4_envimpact_tc_final.pdf>.
Pimentel, David, et al. “Impact of a Growing Population on Natural Resources: The Challenge for Environmental Management.” Frontier: The International Journal of Study Abroad 13 (2012): 105-31. Document.
Tuomisto, Hanna and Avijit G. Roy. “Could cultured meat reduce the environmental impact of agriculture in Europe?” 8th International Conference on LCA in the Agri-Food Sector. Rennes, France, 2012. Document.
Walker, Polly, et al. “Public health implications of meat production and consumption.” Public Health Nutrition 8.4 (2005): 348-356. Document.
UNEP. “Growing greenhouse gas emissions due to meat production.” 2012. Web. <http://www.unep.org/pdf/unep-geas_oct_2012.pdf>.