Types of books you read (adventure, mysterious or fiction and non-fictional.

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Types of books you read (adventure, mysterious or fiction and non-fictional.

Category: Business Plan

Subcategory: Classic English Literature

Level: High School

Pages: 2

Words: 550

Types of books you read
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Introduction
There are three types of books that we normally read. The books can be classified into adventure, mysterious or fiction, and non-fictional books. Reading becomes so interesting and addictive when we settle for reading and enjoying the favorite books and interesting stories. The overwhelming interest developed on reading these books creates an immense understanding of the content as well as sharpening our command in English. Different people enjoy reading different kinds of literature but for me, I will go with the three that I have mentioned. Different books also have a different storyline, style as well as several other literary differences.
Some of the books that we read can be classified as an adventure. They are the genre of fiction and exciting undertaking that involves risk as well as physical danger, forming the main storyline. An adventure is a series of events happening outside of the course of an ordinary life of a protagonist and normally associated with danger. They move quickly, and their stories have been popular subjects in the world of literature. Stories of adventure normally overlap with other genres such as crime novels, war novels, sea stories, spy stories, fantasy, science fiction and westerns. Even though adventure stories presume the setting of these genres, the first-placed plot of these stories focuses on the hero’s action within the setting. Some of these stories are; Star Wars, My Special Christmas Adventure, Frozen Fever, My pulp adventure, Spider-man, My Adventure with turtles and many more.
Books that we read can also be classified as mysterious or fiction. They often involve a mysterious crime or death. They may incorporate a supernatural mystery, and the solution may not be logical (MacIntyre & Lavin, 1977). Most often each suspect in a closed circle mast have a proper motive as well as a reasonable chance to commit the crime, and the central character must be the guy who ultimately solves the mystery. Examples of these books include; Catching Fire, Slammed, Davinci Code, Hunger Games, Starshine, The Wronged Sun and many more. Many people have continued to develop an interest in these stories because of several TV shows that uses themes of mystery and the continuous publication of several juvenile and adult novels.
The other category is the non-fictional books. They are stories whose authors assumes responsibilities in good faith the accuracy and truth of the events and information they present. It would be a fraud if the work if full of dishonesty while the author claims responsibility (Williams, Metzger, Brodbeck & Gray, 1953). They may be brought up either subjectively or objectively. Factual assertions and descriptions of nonfictions may either be accurate or otherwise. They may also bring up a true or false account in the area of question. However, the authors of these stories genuinely claim or believe them to be truthful during their composition. Authors of these stories can also write about fiction, typically called literary criticism and give information as well as analysis of other works. Examples of non-fiction books are; expository, argumentative, essays on literature or art, biographies, memoirs, journalism, historical writings, economic writings, functional and opinion pieces.
Conclusion
In summary, we can categorize the books that we read as an adventure, mysterious or fiction and non-fiction. The content of these different types of books may differ in aspect like the storyline. Some speak about the reality (non-fiction) while others are based on imagination. The insight will enable you to figure out what you expect when you are dealing with any book.
Reference
Williams, S., Metzger, W., Brodbeck, M., & Gray, J. (1953). American Non-Fiction 1900-1950. Books Abroad, 27(4), 437. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/40092571MacIntyre, T., & Lavin, M. (1977). A Haze of the Mysterious. Books Ireland, (16), 171. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/20624461