The Legacy of Pres. Abraham Lincoln

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The Legacy of Pres. Abraham Lincoln

Category: Critical Essay

Subcategory: History

Level: College

Pages: 2

Words: 550

The legacy of Abraham Lincoln
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April 16, 1865, an obituary For Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln’s death announcement met Americans with great shock and a mood of uncertainty. The assassin John Wilkes escaped, but the government is on a serious manhunt. With the loss of our sixteenth president on the April 15th, 1865, in a social event as a result of non-patriotic citizen’s conspiracies, we have lost a great leader.
Born in 1809 in Kentucky to Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks, Lincoln is a true son for America. Dying at age 56, Abraham has contributed immensely to our nation politically, economically and socially (Thomas, 2008). He has achieved a lot, but not enough to deserve this cold blood quick send off to his grave.
Lincoln, due to his gained outspoken nature was chosen to be an army captain in the Black Hawk war of 1832. The appointment set his first political step and since then his contribution include the appointment to the Illinois legislature. With continuous political experience he noticed enslaving blacks was not morally upright, he believed that people could be more economically productive when free than enslaved (Schwartz & Schuman, 2005). Lincoln was considered to be charismatic and a good story teller that contributed to the unity of the Union army during the American civil wars. He faced opposition from his generals, cabinet secretaries at times from American citizens, but he was determined to see America through the civil wars as commander in chief. He created a sound foreign policy that discouraged other nations from interfering with the civil war. Economically he signed into law the transcontinental railroad bill.
Lincoln leaves four children and a widower; the funeral will be attended held on May 4th at the Oak Ridge Cemetery. Friends and family are invited to attend.
May God rest his soul in peace.April 16, 2015, on a remembrance of his legacy.
Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth president of the now United, States of America, died one hundred and fifty years ago on an assassination. The president was attending a social event at the Fords theatre where John Booth assassinated him. Today is a memorial moment to celebrate an American hero; Lincoln is the reason some of the most significant things we enjoy exist.
Lincoln as a child grew with slavery being the order of the day but with time he came with a contrary idea and through the legislative initiative during his leadership, slavery was abolished. He was guided by a moral character that once the current President Obama in one of his speeches acknowledged that he is a model leader to be emulated. He was a self-driven person and taught himself law and won several cases that corporate companies sorted for him to help in cases. All races interact on American grounds because of his humane and inspiring action. We remember him for pioneering the emancipation process and the famous quotes like those who deny others freedom, deserve not to be free as well (Schwartz, 1997). Such is a quote that is used across the globe to promote antislavery actions, and this makes him not only an American hero but a global one.
Humble beginning marked Lincoln life, and he was determined to achieve greatness. Lincoln could walk long distances just to borrow a book for reading. The ambitious nature and the focus pushed him to the most powerful position in America. Abraham remains an encouragement to those who come from humble origins that they can achieve whatever they desire if they keep the focus.
Your turn up is a clear indication that Lincoln is still living with us and that his contributions to the American is the legacy we celebrate. May his soul rest in peace as God blesses America.
References
Schwartz, B. (1997). Collective memory and history: How Abraham Lincoln became a symbol of racial equality. Sociological Quarterly, 469-496.
Schwartz, B., & Schuman, H. (2005). History, Commemoration, and Belief: Abraham Lincoln in American Memory, 1945-2001. American Sociological Review, 70(2), 183-203.
Thomas, B. P. (2008). Abraham Lincoln: a biography. SIU Press.