The Employee Retention Committee

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The Employee Retention Committee

Category: Case Study

Subcategory: Health

Level: College

Pages: 2

Words: 550

Employee Retention Committee
Name
Institution

Employee Retention Committee
Question 1.
The Employee Retentions Committee meeting presented some occurrences and omissions that indicated faulty practice. Firstly, the meeting was called for ten days before its occurrence using unofficial communication channels. Ideally, the members should have been sent reminders that the meeting was to occur on that day and time. This would help them n remembering that a meeting was scheduled. Additionally, official communication channels (such as emails and letters) should have been used to ensure that the members understood the importance of the meeting. Secondly, the meeting agenda should have been presented before the meeting to allow the members to prepare adequately for the meeting. This should have been done when the members were being informed of the meeting occurrence. Thirdly, adequate copies of the meeting references should have been provided at the meeting. In this case, Andrew only had one copy that he was using, claiming he was not aware that others would need copies. He should have assumed that everyone would require a copy. Fourthly, there appears to be no clear demarcation of duties. Even the members are not sure who should be doing what. This makes it difficult to track the committee activities. Each member should be assigned tasks and responsibilities based on knowledge and experience. Fifthly, accurate meeting records should be kept in an orderly and chronological order to facilitate referrals to past decisions. For instance, the previous meeting assigned responsibilities but Andrew has no record of who was given what responsibility was thereby making it difficult to make progress reports of what had been accomplished so far. Sixthly, the committee does not have clear handover policies to ensure a smooth transition without interrupting its activities. In this case, it is known that Elaine will be leaving the committee soon, as such a replacement should be selected to shadow Elaine during the meeting so as to facilities smooth transition and non-interruption of activities when she eventually leaves. Finally, the meeting did not have a clear agenda. A prior meeting had agreed on how the meeting was to proceed yet that is not what happened. Instead, a new agenda was introduced and used to hijack the meeting (Liebler & McConnell, 2012). Addressing the seven occurrences and omissions would have allowed the meeting to proceed without fault.
Question 2.
The composition and members of the committee were faulty. Firstly, managers were made to serve with non-managers in the committee. This created a situation in which the managers were unwilling to set aside their power and position for the sake of the team. Additionally, this presented members with unequal knowledge and ability, causing an imbalance of power and domination where some opinions were not expressed. For instance, Robert easily hijacks the meeting agenda, changing it from what should have been discussed even when Dawson protested. As such, I would recommend that the committee be composed of individuals from the same level and with equivalent knowledge and experience. In this respect, the committee should be comprised of either management personnel or workers to as to avoid this problem. Secondly, the committee is not representative of the hospital personnel and the medical professions employed at the hospital. This has created a situation where only some of the professions are represented and their opinions considered while others are ignored. I would correct this problem by ensuring that all the professions are included. For instance, I would create a position for physicians and another position for surgeons. Finally, I would create the position of a secretary to the committee to facilitate record taking. This would ensure that there was a copy of the committee deliberations for easy tracking and review of performance (Liebler & McConnell, 2012).
Concerning the committee goal, it is clear but does not plainly and fully delineate limits on the committee responsibility and authority. In this case, the goal is stated as ‘reducing undesirable turnover and thus enhancing retention’ but there is no mention of its function and limits. Additionally, the teams boundaries have not been mentioned thereby allowing the members to become distracted during team meetings (Liebler & McConnell, 2012).

Reference
Liebler, J. & McConnell, C. (2012). Management Principles for Health Professionals, 6th ed. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.