rogerian argument method

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rogerian argument method

Category: Capstone Project

Subcategory: Computer Science

Level: College

Pages: 2

Words: 550

Rogerian Argument for the Center for Disease Controls Stance on Opioid Prescriptions
ITT Technical Institute
Abstract
This paper will explore the differing points of view on the CDC’s proposed new guidelines for the prescription of opioids. Focusing on the care that the patient is receiving with the use of these new plans and how the new guidelines would change the doctor-patient relationship. Then using the Rogerian argument method, we will view both sides of the discussion. First the paper will look at the problem, the control of patient pain through the use of drugs, and the basis for the CDC’s new guidelines. Then the paper will look at the opposing idea and examine its merit taking the time to make sure that it is given proper weight and consideration. Then the paper will look at the CDC’s opinion and examine its merit. Once both ideas have been heard fully, a plan will be crafted that will allow both sides input on coming up with a solution to the disagreement that will hopefully please all parties.

Rogerian Argument for the Center for Disease Controls Stance on Opioid Prescriptions
Pain is a horrible problem to live with. Anyone who has ever been in pain for any length of time would tell you that sometimes you want anything to take that pain away. If a doctor deems that such pain could be alleviated, for any length of time with the prescription of opioids they should not feel that they are being restricted to give them. The stance from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to change the way that doctors prescribe opioids could lead to some patients not being able to gain access to drugs that could help them with their pain. This would have grave consequences for many good and law abiding patients who only needed help with their pain. If the only way for a patient to gain relief is through the use of opioids doctors should not feel that they are not being allowed to do so.
Opposing View
The ability to care for a patient in a way that a doctor deems correct should always be preserved. They are professionals who have spent a lot of time and effort to attain their position. If these professionals decide that the best way to handle a patient’s problem is to prescribe opioids they should be able to without fear of repercussions. Any new rules by the CDC that would hinder the doctor’s ability to treat their patients would be a problem. Taking away tools that the medical community have used for years can ultimately hurt the patients and should not be considered.
Defense of The CDC’s New Plan
The proposal by the CDC would make it easier for doctors to monitor their patients’ health while they are on an addictive drug. Calling for doctors to screen patients and make sure that they are good candidates for a substance is a good thing. If it is seen that the patient has a history of dependency or abuse, the doctor would be able to tailor the patient’s care accordingly. The CDC has noticed an increase in opioid dependency in recent years, both through the use of prescriptions and heroin. If new screen methods can lower these numbers, then it would greatly help patients in the long run.
There will also be a push on alternatives to opioids to be used to treat pain, and limiting time spent on them for procedures. Both of these options can be extremely useful because there are times when opioids are too strong of an option for pain management. If pain can be managed using alternative less addictive measures or therapies, the patient and doctor should explore these options. Opioids should only be used for a long enough time as to allow the pain to be managed in another way.
Combining Both Plans for the Good of the Patient
Many people use opioids responsibly; they take them to get rid of the pain that they would not have otherwise been able to manage. The new methods suggested by the CDC would in no way remove the doctors’ ability to give out opioids when they see fit to do so. Doctors should never feel like they are being told that they cannot prescribe such a useful drug to their patients. However, doctors should also always be mindful of the overall health of their patients, and that includes whether or not they are becoming addicted to the medications that are there to help them. Simple screening methods and basic patient follow through are great ways to keep problems from beginning. By helping to keep an eye on patients habits, the doctors could be helping save the patient from many future problems.

References
Liss, G. (2015, December 20). The CDC is trying to keep pain medication from those who need it. The Washington Post.
Retrieved from
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-cdc-is-trying-to-keep-pain-medication-from-those-who-need-it/2015/12/20/ac1a05ea-a5da-11e5-8318-bd8caed8c588_story.htmlBernstein, L. (2015, December 14). CDC urge doctors to curb opioid prescriptions: “The risks are addiction and death, and the benefits are unproven.”. The Washington Post.
Retrieved from
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2015/12/14/hoping-to-curb-the-prescription-opioid-epidemic-cdc-proposes-new-guidelines-for-doctors/