primates & humans

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primates & humans

Category: Article

Subcategory: Time Management

Level: High School

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Primates & amp; Humans
Primates &amp
Primate is mammals that have no/and or short tails and lives to win the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, Europe, Asia and some parts of South American continents. They have five digits on each of their limbs; for grasping on branches of trees. Their bodies are covered with fur that aids them in keeping warm in the cold weather of for example the tropical rain forests (Zrenner, 6). Primates have a relatively smaller cranium; a reason given for this is because they have lower brain compared to humans.
During chewing, their bone cheeks are so much put under pressure, thus, they have a larger end cranium to reinforce the cheek bone so that it does not crush under this stress. They have forward – facing eyes that seem to resemble a binocular and for this feature, they are said to have an accurate perception of distance (Zrenner, 9). Some, like the Columbus monkey, have more fur on their tails than any other parts of their body; a feature that gives them buoyancy such that they can jump from tree to tree or without falling. Scientists argue that they are members of the modern day human that did not undergo the complete phase of evolution. And for this reason, primates have no great language and communicate with each other through chapping.(Zrenner, 13).
Humans
These, on the other hand, are primates that underwent the complete process of evolution, physically and intellectually. Unlike primates, human walks on two limbs and just like their ancestors, the primates, we still have five digits on our four limbs. Compared to primates, humans have a relatively larger cranium to accommodate the bigger brains than their predecessors (Fleagle, 28). In science, it is believed that this evolution occurred due to changes in the environment and socialization. Therefore, humans have a unique language and relate to each other in a more civilized manner than the ancestral primates. (Fleagle, 33)
Works Cited
Fleagle, John G. Primate Adaptation and Evolution. , 2013. Internet resource.
Zrenner, Eberhart. Neurophysiological Aspects of Color Vision in Primates: Comparative Studies on Simian Retinal Ganglion Cells and the Human Visual System. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 1983. Print.