Potential problems Doris is likely to face as HR Director for for Horigan Hotels

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Potential problems Doris is likely to face as HR Director for for Horigan Hotels

Category: Cause and Effect Essay

Subcategory: Human Resources

Level: College

Pages: 3

Words: 825

Human Resource Problems
Name
Institution
Human Resource problems at Horigan Company
Introduction
Dorris Parkerman is a Human Resources professional. She has been hired to work for Horigan Company, which specializes in hospitality and accommodation, as Human Resources Director, being the first female to ever hold the HR Director’s position. Horigan Company is an international chain of hotels and resorts with listed shares in the New York Stock Exchange. In the recent past, she served as the Director of Human Resources in a major airline company. Since Horigan has overseen a disturbing high turnover of HR Directors in the past four years, she has been elevated to the position to bring the much needed stability and shore up things in the company. This is because she has to look into the affairs of Horigan chain of hotels across the globe. As well, she set out to seal all the loopholes regarding employees of the Horigan. This was informed by the fact that she realized that the company had loose reward/compensation system that was not dictated by merit, experience, and the training that employees had for the right job. She also noted that the recruitment system at the company for its overseas hotel chains, was lopsided as the firm had a designated sources it drew their employees from including higher institution of learning where Incidentally, all the three top most managers – the General, Finance, and Procurement- graduated. Ironically, they were posted to the oversea branches as expatriates!
The Chief Executive Officer of Horigan has organized a strategic meeting for HR section of the firm in the country to recommend the best ways of dealing with HR issues. She has to tackle this monster in the house and thrash out a deal that is appealing to everyone before she leaves for the strategic meeting in three months. She must also address the problems bedeviling oversea branches such as discrimination, management and retention of employees. This essay thus strives to discuss hurdles Dorris is facing and how she is supposed to solve them amicably.
Discussion
As the Head of HR, Dorris is cognizant of the fact that Horigan like any other firm requires a system of reward that is strategic for staff and that which solves the problems of appreciation, benefits, compensation, discrimination and recognition. Horigan as currently constituted has a reward system that is short of the aforementioned components. Again, the reward system is not appropriately aligned with the other strategic blueprints of the firm and the HR policies. As noted earlier, Dorris had realized that most managers in the overseas hotels used their positions in the company to compensate staff based on their personal connections, affiliation and other unethical practices of employment. The company does not have a structured compensation system that could act as a guide to rewarding industrious employees whether local or expatriates. Managers arbitrarily by-passed dedicated staff from the host countries, those who underwent proper training, and understood the local dynamics, including the local language, experienced staff members, and determined compensation based on other factors which discriminated against the deserving local nationals.
This lowers the morale of the employees as they believe that there is nothing to motivate them enough. Consequently, their productivity goes down, negating the tremendous growth the company has experienced over the past decade. When employee productivity is below expectations of the company, the overall organization’s productivity goes down as well. Dorris noted that there were complaints and grumbling from employees but everything was always swept under the rug on a regular basis. The reward and recognition system was not providing her as the HR Director with the right clues and information. The problem was just colossal!
Concerning recruitment, Horigan also fell short of the expected standards in several of its overseas hotels as most staff were hired and fired arbitrarily. As a matter of fact, the company experienced high non-managerial turnover in places such as China and other places. The structure was lacking as the managers used their old boys and girls network to draw a pool of company staff. The serious thing is that the firm had a liaison with some shadowy sources including the University where the most influential managers graduated. This was unethical as it defeated the principle of equal opportunity for all, without any form of discrimination that the firm was supposed to comply with. Currently, the company’s recruitment system operates in a cartel-like style. This, Dorris undertakes to dismantle!
To surmount the first hurdle regarding compensation system, Dorris will have to refer to findings on the reward system. In most studies, scholars found that motivated staff is an essential pointer to the success of the firm. It is revealed that motivated workers work at advanced levels of productivity, making the company run more effectively and efficiently at realizing its goals and objectives. Dorris must establish an effective reward system including both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards at the firm’s main headquarter in New York and other regional headquarters.
Intrinsic rewards entail internal motivation to the staff about the passion, individual interests, and problem-solving capabilities, experience and intelligence of the employee. The managers must, therefore, give meaningful assignments, permit staff advanced levels of independence and create opportunities for staff to exhibit competence in areas of their expertise among others. This means abolishing posting of expatriates to overseas locations and instead utilizes the qualified local citizens to cut on cost and improve performance. Likewise, the managers must offer extrinsic compensation that involves concrete rewards. These must capture monetary rewards, better office, recognition, and promotion. This must be done to the deserving employees from the company’s overseas hotels. It is needless to hire undocumented staff then overwork them for long hours and underpay them with low wages.
On the second challenge that touches on recruitment, Dorris has noted that acquiring and retention of high-quality staff is imperative to Horigan’s success. As such, she has to borrow a leaf from the analysis of the two sources of recruitment including internal and external sources. Using internal sources of recruitment to hire employees has some benefits ranging from familiarity with organization’s culture and staff, easy access to the potential candidate. It is also cheaper and time-saving. As earlier mentioned, Dorris must do away with “expatriate” position and recruit local citizens to work in the overseas branches. This will not only save the company, a lot of wastage in terms of high perks paid to expatriates, but will rapidly improve morale and motivate the employees. This has a positive effect on the company as it improves productivity. The external sources including informal and formal can improve the productivity of the firm. Informal entail rehiring past staff and using referrals. Formal sources involve advertising using websites, agencies for employment and use of newspapers to reach a wider pool of prospective candidates. Let all who aspire to work for Horigan, get appointed through the right channels and procedure that is devoid of integrity issues. Once Dorris establishes structures that integrate these strategies, Horigan will instill a positive culture and inspire its staff. It will curb the issue of paying fines to the Federal government, and contract renewal of company-managed hotels.
References
https://www.google.com/search?q=procurement+laws+in+kenya&oq=procurement+laws+&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0l5.13033j0j9&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.google.com/search?q=procurement+laws+in+kenya&oq=procurement+laws+&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0l5.13033j0j9&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8#
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https://www.google.com/search?q=procurement+laws+in+kenya&oq=procurement+laws+&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0l5.13033j0j9&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.google.com/search?q=procurement+laws+in+kenya&oq=procurement+laws+&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0l5.13033j0j9&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8#
https://www.google.com/search?q=procurement+laws+in+kenya&oq=procurement+laws+&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0l5.13033j0j9&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.google.com/search?q=procurement+laws+in+kenya&oq=procurement+laws+&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0l5.13033j0j9&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8#
https://www.google.com/search?q=procurement+laws+in+kenya&oq=procurement+laws+&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0l5.13033j0j9&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8. (n.d.). Retrieved from