Los V

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Los V

Category: Critical Thinking

Subcategory: Classic English Literature

Level: College

Pages: 2

Words: 550

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The Los Vendidos and Mulatto Playwrights
The los vendidos is a play written by Luis Valdez and it uses stereotypes to bring an end to racism. Latino stereotypes are the main highlight and it’s purposed to show their effects on people and the individuals stereotyped. The Mexican characters that are in the play embodied each branded cast contrary to the race and thus giving way to readers to analyze completely and to understand the prejudices they may as well have against the race. The secretary’s rejection of one after another of all the models is a showcase of how Mexicans were treated by the general public. It will bring to light on the feelings of the Latinos. Generally, all the characters were exposed off their stereotyping nature that appeared to put them in one category and seemed to become one. This is because they all spoke Spanish and as well worked together. The significance of this play is in it is cynic (Garza 80).
Mulatto is a play from the Deep South. Stereotypical characters that are associated with the African Americans of that time are highlighted and they are not appealing to anyone. It clearly reflects in the racial fight that has been there for long between the owner of the white plantation well known to many as Colonel Thomas Norwood and his mulatto counterpart son named Robert. Thomas has rejected Robert as one of his own. The play reveals qualities such as the uneducated speech of the African Americans of that era. It brings into sight the extent of Americans racism.
The mulatto and vendidos play are similar in that they both are designed to reveal stereotype prejudice although vendidos cast is the Latinos and mulatto are based on the African Americans.
The los vendidos examines how stereotypes of the Latinos origin in California are treated by the state and the local people (Valdez 56).
The play is set in honest Sancho’s curio shop. Sancho reveals four models to Miss Jiménez a Chicana or otherwise known as Mexican-American, who seems extremely ignorant of the Mexican cultural stereotypes that are displayed in each of the four presentations. She needs to purchase a Mexican model that will assist the governor to please a bigger voting audience. We have the sturdy farm worker and she rejects him because he doesn’t know how to speak English, Johnny pachuco a rowdy Chicano gang member of the 1950s and is expressed as vicious, drug abuser, but an easy culprit and thus is perfect to dehumanize. We have the romantic model of Revolucionario a famous and martyred bandit, but he is rejected as he is not American made and is purely Mexican.
Finally, we have a perfect representative Eric Garcia, who is a contemporary Latino model and nicely dressed. He is also very exciting regarding public speaking and is a university graduate that is polite, motivated and bilingual. However, she gets reluctant when it’s time to purchase him because he stages a Spanish vocal protest. The twist at the end of the play is that the robots are actual human beings and Sancho is a robot. In the mulatto, it’s the headstrong attitude of the plantations reject son Robert who is reluctant to work in his father’s cotton fields and its set to appear as daring to the audiences (Barnet 45).
In the end, we can see that both writers are passing on the message that both stereotypes that are Latinos and blacks are aware of their rights and aren’t afraid to take measures that will put an end the prejudice they face.
Works Cited
Barnet, Sylvan. Types of Drama: Plays and Contexts. 8th ed. New York: Longman, 2001. Print.
Garza, Roberto J. Contemporary Chicano Theatre. Notre Dame: U of Notre Dame, 1976. Print.
Valdez, Luis. Los Vendidos (Actos). Cambridge [England: Proquest LLC, 2005. Print.