Interview a Juvinile Probation Officer and mainly ask him/her how does writing play an importing task/skill with their career

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Interview a Juvinile Probation Officer and mainly ask him/her how does writing play an importing task/skill with their career

Category: Statistics Project

Subcategory: Criminal law

Level: College

Pages: 2

Words: 550

Student’s Name
Professor’s Name
Subject
Date
Interview with a Juvenile Correctional Officer
When we think about correctional officers, we tend to image burly individuals in prisons who only have to deal with prisoners and their lives. Nevertheless, what we learnt after this research is that most of the correctional officers have to process an important amount of paperwork, which means that without the proper writing skills, those reports would be incomplete, and could severely hinder the possibilities of an innocent inmate of not being unlawfully incarcerated. The opposite can happen too, that a misfiled or poorly written report could grant freedom to someone who does not deserve it (Rutter 288). In this essay, we aim to interview a correctional officer to understand and assess ourselves on the importance of having good writing skills as a way to succeed in the job. We interviewed county of San Diego juvenile probation officer James Munez. Officer Munez has been working as a juvenile correctional officer for some years and will share with us the importance of writing in his career.
Our source, James Munez has been a correctional officer for five years now, we consider that he is a credible source not only because he is an officer, but because he seemed a resourceful person, willing to shed some light on a dark theme. “We are not what people think we are, I mean, most of the stuff we do is pretty boring” According to our source, his profession is composed of 60% of paperwork, and the amount of “action” is low. James told us that in his line of duty is not uncommon to face life-threatening situations, but to him, that has not been the case yet “I’ve gotten pretty stressed sometimes, but we have sorted the situations fast and nobody got hurt” Since he stated that most of his profession is dealing with paperwork, we got to our point, which is to assess ourselves on how writing plays an important role in his position. What he said left us quite baffled. “In our training we undergo a basic case report filing workshop, and we are expected to hand several written essays in the course of our training. Besides, in our training we are taught to use tools on basic questions like: Who, why, when, where, and the action taken. This helps us on quickly reporting the situations in order to avoid misfiling and causing a problem” As we can see, being a correctional officer is not only about taking care of the inmates, it is about being able to report the situations in a comprehensible and well-structured way. In the same way, we asked our source one final question, about the formatting, and the way they write. Officer Munez said “Back in the day most officers did their reports the way they saw fit, we now have a computer software in charge of formatting our reports to minimize the chances of misfiling, because that could cause a lawsuit or an unlawful incarceration”
CONCLUSION
The interview was quite helpful, as we had the chance to assess ourselves in a theme on which the public has a rather distorted image. As we now know, it is not what the media depicts, it is a profession that might even seem a little dull, but its importance should be taken into account, as these professionals devoted to the care and rehabilitation of youth might be deeper and have a greater understanding of criminal system that many attorneys lack.

Works Cited
Rutter, R. (1982). Teaching Writing to Probation Officers: Problems, Methods, and Resources.College Composition and Communication, 33(3), 288-295. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/357493
Munez, James, Officer. “Interview with a Juvenile Correctional Officer.” Personal interview. 15 Apr. 2015.