Industrialist Nursery Rhyme

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Industrialist Nursery Rhyme

Category: Book Review

Subcategory: History

Level: High School

Pages: 1

Words: 275

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Industrialist Nursery Rhyme
The usefulness of oil cannot be ignored in any way, and that has led to the oil companies vying with each other at every step to reach the topmost position in the oil world. Most often, standard oil is compared to a huge octopus that symbolizes suppression and finally destruction. In the modern world, the situation seems to be the same. On the one hand, the earth is losing all fertility and is on the verge of destruction, on the other hand, industrialists especially the oil companies are trying to overpower the smaller companies that had supplied oil so long to the entire world. The world has become an arena where the theory of the survival of the fittest/ strongest/ richest is being accepted now. As seen in the cartoon, Bill Sikes is one of the greatest rogues of history depicted by Charles Dickens (Oliver Twist). He is the authority and rules over all smaller rogues, and while they work for him, he extracts all that they earn. The same is true for the standard oil companies. With decreasing supply of oil, many companies have become financially weak and are forced to merge with larger companies to survive (Dunn 37). This gave opportunity to the stronger units to create pressure on the weaker firms and like the nursery rhyme with which we all are familiar “Row row row your boat” they extracted all their strength and workforce including man-force to achieve their ends namely profit completely pushing them to the walls (Studwell 82). The standard oil companies are encircling the smaller companies from all quarters like the octopus leaving behind only the skeleton. The poor creatures cannot even ask for their due shares and are left with a meager amount that is not enough to survive.
Work Cited
Dunn, Richard J. Oliver Twist: Whole Heart and Soul (Twayne’s Masterwork Series No. 118). New York: Macmillan. Print.
Studwell, S. M. The Americana Song Reader. New York: Haworth Press. 1997. Print.