Fiction and Twilight

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Fiction and Twilight

Category: Admission Essay

Subcategory: Computer Engineering

Level: College

Pages: 2

Words: 550

[Student’s Full Name]
[Professor’s Full Name]
[Subject]
[Date]
Fiction Books and Twilight
Being an avid reader since I was a child, I have read many titles. Nevertheless, I must say that the books I like the most are those oriented toward a young audience. This has made me quite open toward literature considered “worthless” to older readers. What I want from fiction is not smoke-and-mirrors, I want real make-believe. I want to believe that what is being told can happen. In the same way, I want relatable characters that are human, not superhuman characters that cannot be harmed. As I said earlier, my passion for books suited for young readers has made me an acrid critic of many titles. I tend to consider they offer chewed-down stories with the guise of being “for teens” or “for teenagers”. It does not matter whether you are seven or eighty years old, everyone wants to be challenged, that is why I consider that the best books are those who offer that possibility.
That is why, although I regard Twilight as an overhyped book, I recognize its importance in the modern English literature. However, I must say that in my opinion it offers a watered-down vision of a teenager’s life. In the first place, it puts Bella in the position of a worthless damsel in distress whose sole desire is becoming a vampire. When Edward refuses to grant immortality to her and decides to leave, Bella falls into a depression that lasts for months, only to be rescued by Jacob, another man. The only moment when I perceived that Bella wanted to do something for herself was when Edward was in danger. On the other hand, Edward is depicted as a perfect gentleman, who is unwilling to appease his hunger with Bella, as he loves her. She is an object of desire but in a Victorian way. The relationship between Bella and Edward resemble a sonnet of courteous love, where the man is not willing to risk the purity of his object of desire. In his intent of removing Bella from the dangers of his condition, he rends her powerless. He even acts like a god when he finally decides to grant her the immortality. In that case, I consider that the relation of gender in the book is unbalanced. It is only when Bella is a vampire that she begins to be an assertive woman, in sync with the rest of the characters. Before that, she is a dove, the only person in the book that is pure.
My critic might be acrid, but despite those facts I have listed, I enjoyed the book. It offers a watered-down version of vampirism, and teenage love, but is entertaining and well-written. Concerning the people’s criticism of the book, I consider that you have to know something if you want to do a critic that has some actual weight. If you do not understand what you are criticizing, your critic is worth nothing. Thankfully, I read it before the Twilight craze started, that made me able to have a clear judgment concerning the book. When all the people are begun to read and comment it, I had read it, and my opinion was formed. Without the judgment popular culture has passed to the book, many people would openly discuss it, and admit they have liked it. However, it has become one of America’s guilty pleasures. That is why Twilight is, and will be one of the most famous books of the century, that is true, but it is not my favorite. I have read a couple of times, and it resists the weight of the scrutiny, but to me, it did not offer the adventure I was looking for.