Fad Diet: Review on “Macrobiotic Diet”

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Fad Diet: Review on “Macrobiotic Diet”

Category: Coursework

Subcategory: Nutrition and Diet

Level: Academic

Pages: 5

Words: 1375

A fad diet is referred to as an eating regime that endorses on eating specific food groups and avoiding certain food groups to address a specific healthcare problem. Such diets are popularly consumed in the context of obesity, overweight or certain diseases like cancer. They are popular as such diets are often recommended by celebrities or media personnel or even clinicians (Mcbean & Speckmann, 1974). An example of such diet is “Macrobiotic Diet”.
A “Macrobiotic Diet” is one which chiefly endorses consumption of eating grains (cereals) as the major staple food. Along with that vegetables should be supplemented adequately. A “Macrobiotic Diet” recommends avoiding intake of refined grains or foods and most products of animal origin. For example, typical Japanese “Macrobiotic Diet” recommends consumption of whole grain cereals, pulses (like legumes), fruits and soy foods. The principle of such diet specification is based on “yin” and “yang”. “Yin” means positive energy and “Yang” means negative energy. Fad diets are viewed to be associated with negative energy, thus favoring their consumption (Kushi, Blauer and Esko, 2004).
Typical recommended Japanese “Macrobiotic Diet” recommends 40% to 60% of whole grains, 25% to 30% vegetables, 5-10% of beans, Miso soup -5%, sea vegetables and traditional processed foods-5% to 10%. Occasional consumption seafood, nuts, fish and beverages are also recommended. Moreover, nightshade vegetables like tomato, peppers, potatoes and eggplants are not recommended. These vegetables are considered to produce inflammation and may cause osteoporosis (Kushi, Blauer and Esko, 2004).
References
Kushi, Michio; Blauer, Stephen; Esko, Wendy (2004). The Macrobiotic Way: The Complete
Macrobiotic Lifestyle Book Avery. ISBN 1-58333-180-8
McBean, L and Speckmann,E. (1974). Food faddism: a challenge to nutritionists and
dietitians. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 27:1071-1078
My FAD Diet Plan
Name:……………..
Age: 20years
Height: 5 feet 6 inches
Sex: female
Weight=195 pound
My recommended calories = 2000 calories
My Actual Intake = 2027 calories
Breakfast Lunch Dinner Snacks
Rice, brown, regular (no added fat or salt)= 2cups Rice, brown, regular (no added fat or salt)= 2cups Rice, brown, regular (no added fat or salt)= 2cups Lettuce mixed (mixed greens, salad mix, spring mix) raw= 2 cups shredded or chopped
Lettuce mixed (mixed greens, salad mix, spring mix) raw= 2 cups shredded or chopped Lettuce mixed (mixed greens, salad mix, spring mix) raw= 2 cups shredded or chopped Lettuce mixed (mixed greens, salad mix, spring mix) raw= 2 cups shredded or chopped Green beans, fresh cooked(with salt but no fat)
Green beans, fresh cooked(with salt but no fat) Green beans, fresh cooked(with salt but no fat) Green beans, fresh cooked(with salt but no fat) Carrots raw= 1 medium
Carrots raw= 1 medium Carrots raw= 1 medium Carrots raw= 1 medium Fruit juice blend (100%) juice= 1 cup= 2cups
Fruit juice blend (100%) juice= 1 cup My Food Consumption Statistics
Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein Foods
Amount recommended 6 oz 21/2 cups 2 cups 3 cups 51/2 oz
Amount Eaten 12 oz 10 cups 3cups 0 cups 0 cups
Status Over Over Over Under Under
% of Target 200% 396% 150% 0% 0%
My Food Consumption Statistics according to Nutrient Intake
Your plan is based on a 2000 Calorie allowance.
    Nutrients Target Average Eaten Status
   Total Calories 2000 Calories 2027 Calories Over
   Protein (g)*** 46 g 50 g OK
   Protein (% Calories)*** 10 – 35% Calories 10% Calories OK
   Carbohydrate (g)*** 130 g 441 g OK
   Carbohydrate (% Calories)*** 45 – 65% Calories 87% Calories Over
   Dietary Fiber 25 g 54 g OK
   Total Sugars No Daily Target or Limit 105 g No Daily Target or Limit
   Added Sugars No Daily Target or Limit 0 g No Daily Target or Limit
   Total Fat 20 – 35% Calories 6% Calories Under
   Saturated Fat < 10% Calories 1% Calories OK
   Polyunsaturated Fat No Daily Target or Limit 2% Calories No Daily Target or Limit
   Monounsaturated Fat No Daily Target or Limit 2% Calories No Daily Target or Limit
   Linoleic Acid (g)*** 12 g 5 g Under
   Linoleic Acid (% Calories)*** 5 – 10% Calories 2% Calories Under
   α-Linolenic Acid (% Calories)*** 0.6 – 1.2% Calories 0.4% Calories Under
   α-Linolenic Acid (g)*** 1.1 g 1.0 g Under
   Omega 3 – EPA No Daily Target or Limit 0 mg No Daily Target or Limit
   Omega 3 – DHA No Daily Target or Limit 0 mg No Daily Target or Limit
   Cholesterol < 300 mg 0 mg OK
    Minerals Target Average Eaten Status
   Calcium 1000 mg 1071 mg OK
   Potassium 4700 mg 4129 mg Under
   Sodium** < 2300 mg 1872 mg OK
   Copper 900 µg 2016 µg OK
   Iron 18 mg 15 mg Under
   Magnesium 310 mg 797 mg OK
   Phosphorus 700 mg 1409 mg OK
   Selenium 55 µg 118 µg OK
   Zinc 8 mg 11 mg OK
    Vitamins Target Average Eaten Status
   Vitamin A 700 µg RAE 3483 µg RAE Over
   Vitamin B6 1.3 mg 2.9 mg OK
   Vitamin B12 2.4 µg 0.0 µg Under
   Vitamin C 75 mg 616 mg OK
   Vitamin D 15 µg 0 µg Under
   Vitamin E 15 mg AT 7 mg AT Under
   Vitamin K 90 µg 1012 µg OK
   Folate 400 µg DFE 748 µg DFE OK
   Thiamin 1.1 mg 2.0 mg OK
   Riboflavin 1.1 mg 1.5 mg OK
   Niacin 14 mg 27 mg OK
   Choline 425 mg 287 mg Under
Summary & Analysis
The analysis of my Fad diet indicates that although my daily calorie intake that is recommended is 2000 calories, I consume around 2027 calories. Hence, I feel that the total consumption of calories is within the recommended range of +/- 10%. However, regarding the intake of macronutrients, I consume more than the recommended amount of calories from carbohydrates (87% versus 45% to 65%). The calories from protein are within the recommended range (10% versus 10% to 35%). The intakes of calories from fats are lower (6% versus 20%-35%). The decreased intake of fat may lead to decreased absorption of fat-soluble vitamins in my body and increased carbohydrate consumption may increase the chance of diabetes. Most of the minerals that are consumed are within normal range except for potassium. Decreased intake of potassium may disturb the electrolyte balance and lead to issues of excitation of cells. However, there is a major deviation in consumption of vitamins. Decreased consumption of vitamin D and Vitamin E may lead to brittleness of bones and decreased anti-oxidant status respectively. Decrease in vitamin B12 consumption may lead to defects in formation of hemoglobin.