Compare and contrast racial conflict in the South and the West

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Compare and contrast racial conflict in the South and the West

Category: Analytical Essay

Subcategory: History

Level: Academic

Pages: 1

Words: 275

Compare and Contrast: Racial Conflicts in the West and South of the U.S.
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Introduction
The attitude of the Americans toward the issue of racism has changed substantially since the end of the Civil War. Immigration have changed the view of people toward race and broadened the spectre of race-related issues. In the same way, racism, and racial conflicts can take many forms, and despite not being violent; techniques such as racial profiling can be equally racist. According to the American Civil Liberties Union (2015) Racial Profiling “refers to the discriminatory practice by law enforcement officials of targeting individuals for suspicion of crime based on the individual’s race, ethnicity, religion or national origin.”
In this essay, we shall address the topic of racial profiling. How are the south, and the west different regarding those issues? We shall offer evidence and contrast them as to provide a thorough and comprehensive idea.
According to the American Civil Liberties Union (2015) Racial Profiling “refers to the discriminatory practice by law enforcement officials of targeting individuals for suspicion of crime based on the individual’s race, ethnicity, religion or national origin.”
Racism Stereotyping and Profiling in the West and South of the U.S.
Racial profiling in the South
In the South, many Latinos have complained that they were frisked and search more often than the rest of the population. Also, according to a report of the ACLU, Texas police, and border patrols search Mexican Americans under the premise that they are illegal immigrants (ACLU, 2009). In the same way, several jurisdictions in the South states enforce police checkpoints in Latino areas as a way to catch immigrants and deport them (SPLC, 2010).
Racial profiling in the West
In the West, in cities like California more African Americans are arrested compared to Caucasian individuals. In California, African Americans are 76% more likely to be stopped than white individuals. (Ayres, 2008). Oregon suffers from the same situation as Black residents are 36% more likely to be stopped than White residents and 10% more than the Latino population (Oregon Police Department, 2009). This indicates a bias in the policing efforts that reflects an underlying racism.
Conclusion
The truth is that despite the efforts to live in a country that is not racist, nor profiles individuals based in the race; there are no signs that the situation is going to stop soon. This means that despite the intents of treating the rest of the population in a fairer way, the country still lives in racism. The South and the West of the country might be different, but they share the issue of immigrants. This also causes an issue, as the Americans might feel threatened by the immigrants and retaliate. Despite the differences, both parts of the country share an issue, but they focus it differently.

References
Ayres, I. (2008, October 23). Racial profiling in L.A.: The numbers don’t lie. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 24, 2015, from http://articles.latimes.com/2008/oct/23/opinion/oe-ayres23
Plan to Address Racial Profiling. (2009). Portland Police Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2015, from http://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/230887
Racial Profiling: Definition. (2015). Retrieved July 25, 2015, from https://www.aclu.org/racial-profiling-definition
Southern Poverty Law Center. (2015). Retrieved July 25, 2015, from http://www.splcenter.org/publications/under-siege-life-low-income-latinos-south/2-racial-profiling
The Persistence of Racial and Ethnic Profiling in the United States. (2009). American Civil Liberties Union, from https://www.aclu.org/files/pdfs/humanrights/cerd_finalreport.pdf