Antigone response

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Antigone response

Category: Common App Essay

Subcategory: History

Level: College

Pages: 1

Words: 275

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Arete in the Greek context is used to mean moral virtue. In the play, Antigone protests all the laws the laws that are contrary to her moral principles and conscience. She claims, “It is my nature to join in love, not hate.”
Creon, one of the characters in play argues that justice is based on the law, ruling out anything like an unjust law. He claims that people must obey the law made by the head of the city whether they are large or big, right or wrong. On the other hand, Antigone strongly believes that there exist unjust laws. Therefore, she has a moral responsibility to disobey a law that is contrary to what she thinks is right and just. Antigone,360 dared “It was not the proclamation of God. That final Justice That rules the world below makes no such laws.” It is in this specific scenario when the city laws tend to be contrary to the traditional laws and customs of people in the city. Antigone makes a decision not to follow the claims by Creon to give Polynices a great burial brings. It brings out the concept of civil disobedience. In other words, she was dishonoring the law of the city on moral grounds.
As, much as Creon believes on the supremacy of the needs of the state, Antigone believes otherwise. She believes in the law that direct her conscience that she views as the high law and ready to face the consequences of her civil disobedience. She declares “This death of mine is of no importance” pg. 370.
The play has very strong lessons that we should emulate in real life situation. It teaches us about standing firm to fight for what is right and to do away with exploitation from the people in the authority. The chorus brings out Antigone as the girl in the city who will rise as an individual and die young. The other lesson we can derive from this play is to learn to confront our authority whenever they go wrong because they are human beings who may make mistakes. In the play, Antigone confronts and disobey Creon, the king whenever she feels the laws enacted are not just.
Work cited
Sophocles., and Andrew Brown. Antigone. Warminster, Wiltshire, England: Aris & Phillips, 1987. Print.