A Streetcar Named Desire

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A Streetcar Named Desire (scene three)
In the play, Stanley portrays both wise and brutal behaviors. For instance, his brutality is seen when he throws the radio through the window. He then hurls the phone when Eunice refuses to answer. Finally, he comes in to play a sign of brutality when he beats his wife, Stella. Being wise enough, he apologizes to Stella after buttering her and calling her loudly outside the street.
What does Stanley fear?
According to the play, one can argue that it is true that Stanley fears to lose Stella. He would love having Stella around all the time. For instance Stanley when Stella suggest that it is not the time to play, Stanly comes in to reject the plea but rather slaps her buttocks and instruct her to go upstairs to Eunice. Surprisingly, Stanley who now drinks approaches Stella in dance stage and beats her. His fear comes to show when he cannot do without Stella next to him. He tries to call out aloud her wife while necked at the streets. Tries to telephone upstairs in Eunice’s room only to have Stella within his reach.
How Stanley Act With Other To Relieve His Fear?
First it can be argued that Stanley gets drunk so as to best show his puzzling traits over his companion. For instance, he becomes masculine and tries to shut everyone down only when he is drunk. Again his masculine hegemony and authoritative qualities that make him dominate his counterpart is an essential element of alleviating his fear.
Stanley fears to lose Stella but not to Blanche. He is afraid of the advice that Stella may heed from Blanche that he claims may affect their marriage. It is true that Stanley’s action was geared to shut down Blanche’s mood. For instance, when Blanche and Stella arrive he quickly command Stella to take her sister upstairs to Eunice’s place. Again Stanley turns off the radio and throws it outside through the window.
While Blanche’s mental problems stem in part from her sense of guilt, do you think Stella helped bring them about?
Stella is not in a position of helping Blanche’s mental problem that keeps on stemming up with guilt. From the play, Blanche discloses to Stella the rape incidence implicating Stanley. Stella in turn does not believe the accusation. This context shows that she can’t help address Blanche’s mental problem.