15 peer-reviewed sources on developing and performing a learning needs assessment

0 / 5. 0

15 peer-reviewed sources on developing and performing a learning needs assessment

Category: Annotated Bibliography

Subcategory: Nursing

Level: Masters

Pages: 1

Words: 275

15 peer-reviewed sources: developing and performing a learning needs analysis
Name:
Institutional Affiliation:

15 peer-reviewed sources: developing and performing a learning needs analysis
Armstrong, A., & Foley, P. (2003). Foundations for a learning organization: organization learning mechanisms. The Learning Organization.
The authors explain the learning process in organizations and entail the skills required in the event of learning. They underpin different processes that are involved when organizations learn and how they can succeed in the pursuit for knowledge and skills. According to them there are four basic tenets which are required during learning which are the identification of an organizations needs, learning mechanisms, the foundations to be established and the application of the learning needs in the workplace. They succeed in the quest to understand organizations by applying research in different organizations in Australia.
The authors are aware of the requirements of learning and provide basic tenets of learning with ease. They are forthcoming in their methods of research as they make use of subjects who are already working for organizations. Their information is informative and presented in a coherent manner which can be understood easily by new comers in the field.
Aviram, A., Ronen, Y., Somekh, S., Winer, A., & Sarid, A. (2008). Self-Regulated Personalized Learning (SRPL): Developing iClass’s pedagogical model. eLearning Papers, 9(July), 1-17. Retrieved from www.elearningpapers.eu
The article provides information on personalized learning and presents its ideas through the use of a iClass pedagogical model. This is a model that can be easily used when personalized learning is required by individuals in an organization. The iClass model is provided to indicate the various needs of both educators and students during the learning process. Its main focus is the need to achieve educational goals while making use of personalized learning methods.
The authors are aware of the ethical implications of learning, and this makes them to use a model that is reflective of their need. They are able to convey their messages of learning with ease and later adopt the knowledge they think can achieve much success in the process of learning. The article is well researched and timely for organizations wishing to succeed in the quest to have better employees.
Bhuasiri, W., Xaymoungkhoun, O., Zo, H., Rho, J. J., & Ciganek, A. P. (2012). Critical success factors for e-learning in developing countries: A comparative analysis between ICT experts and faculty. Computers and Education, 58(2), 843-855.
Developing nations are used by the authors to indicate the need for learning and the technological advancements that are required for success. They emphasize the use of e-learning as mode that can lead to greater achievements and increased knowledge. The use of ICT is seen as the newest method that can increase the desire for learners to search for more materials online. It therefore enumerates various critical success factors that are associated with e-learning in institutions and organization in developing nations.
The authors are aware of the importance of e-learning and the use of ICT while searching for knowledge and information. Through the experiences they confirm that e-learning in regions with minimal ICT knowledge can be both a challenge to the learners and educators in overall. The information provided lacks clarity as to how the process of using ICT can be achieved in regions with low exposure to computers and the internet as a whole.
Bosuwon, T., & Woodrow, L. (2009). Developing a Problem-Based Course Based on Needs Analysis to Enhance English Reading Ability of Thai Undergraduate Students. RELC Journal.
Woodrow engages respondents in his work on the importance of using problem based approaches while teaching learners. The need to engage learners so as to learn English is emphasized for purposes of succeeding in their learning process. Thai students’ English needs are assessed first for purposes of providing relevant tools while communicating using the business language.
The author is specific in his approach and desires a design that ensures problem based approaches before providing the required lessons to students. He is certain that such a method is relevant and valid for people who have problems when communicating with others in a school or work setting. Having been in the region himself, he is well placed to offer guidance as to which tools are appropriate while learning. The information is relevant and timely for use in regions with low level communicating skills.
Cook, D. A., & Dupras, D. M. (2004). A practical guide to developing effective web-based learning. Journal of general internal medicine, 19(6), 698-707.
A Web based tool for learning can be functional when a need analysis is performed to know the objectives and goals of the processes involved. This are sentiments from Cook and Dupras who feel that having the right objectives in place can determine the right software and tools needed for the learning process. Barriers and implementation procedures are required before the tools is used while learning in the classroom. The students ought to understand their systems and also know how to apply various web based knowledge to ensure success.
The information provided covers the requirements of web based teaching practices can be used to advance knowledge on the part of using the internet during the learning process. It provides step by step processes that are always essential when using the Web and other tools while learning. The authors have knowledge and experience in classroom teaching because of their past experiences and position in the ICT industry from their region.
Ghirardini, B. (2011). E-learning methodologies: A guide for designing and developing e-learning courses. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 138. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/docrep/015/i2516e/i2516e.pdf
Ghirardini enumerates various e-learning methodologies that can be used by students while gaining skills in their different fields of study. It provides detailed information on how to develop and design an e-learning course that is relevant for students and other learners outside the classroom. Instructional designers who are new to the e-learning portal are also given guidance on how they can achieve success while working with different tools in the e-learning industry.
The author presents his ideas in a coherent and simple manner that can be easily understood by learners. The information provided comes from a person who has designed such tools and made others succeed with ease. The information is timely more so during this age of technology revolution around the globe.
Grant, J. (2002). Learning needs assessment: assessing the need. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 324(7330), 156-159.
The author confirms that assessing the need for learning is essential when providing learning tools for students. It helps the educator to understand the needs that can be tackled easily and those that are hard are broken down into small pieces. Such a provision helps learners to grasp ideas with ease and also conform to the trainings provided to them. Assessing the need also removes doubt when teaching as it entails all the necessary gaps that need to be filled by the educators.
The position taken by Grant is essential as most educators do not assess their students needs before providing lessons to them. Having the right information helps educators know exactly where to make more emphasis when teaching. This information is essential and can be used by educators in schools and organizations when imparting knowledge.
Hong, C. M., Chen, C. M., Chang, M. H., & Chen, S. C. (2007). Intelligent web-based tutoring system with personalized learning path guidance. Proceedings – The 7th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, ICALT 2007 (pp. 512-516).
The authors assert that personalized curriculum is vital for learners because fixed paths cannot be appropriate for all learners in an institution. Every learner has a different need or problem that can only be solved by the use of a personalized system of learning. Such methods fulfill the needs of the students without compromising their levels of understanding.
The methods used to present the ideas of the authors is easy to follow and can be understood without any problem. They provide sequential routes that can be used while teaching individuals separately. Such a research is important as it deals with different problems and cases of students who are supposed to learn a specific idea from their educators.
Moore, J. L., Dickson-Deane, C., & Galyen, K. (2011). e-Learning, online learning, and distance learning environments: Are they the same? The Internet and Higher Education.
The authors confirm that the environment of learners is often different and this gives educators a role of choosing their modes of teaching. They focus on three areas of learning which are distance learning, e-learning and online learning. According to them both make use of internet and the Web but usually provide different results.
Making different observations to a single discussion is useful in understanding the best methods to be used while teaching students. The different methods have similar settings but different environments which make them unique in their own way. The information is useful and timely for educators and learners who wish to choose from the varied modes of teaching and learning.
Myers, J., & Pellino, T. A. (2009). Developing new ways to address learning needs of adult abdominal organ transplant recipients. Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), 19(2), 160-166.
The needs of learning among adults are addressed by the article, and it contends that they are a lot which need more attention. This is because most of them come into contact with new learning materials and experiences from those they are used to. The adult generation should therefore be given personalized services if they are to learn and understand various concepts from their educators.
The language of this article is simple and can be understood easily by both learners and their educators. It is vital for educators because they can use it to provide education needs that are relevant in their areas of operation. The information is well researched and can be used for the intended purpose with ease.
OʼShea, C., & Spike, N. (2005). Learning needs analysis–developing a new tool for general practice training. Australian family physician, 34 Suppl 1, 41-43.
The article provides information on the importance of developing different curriculum tools for different learners. Such tools can be used for specific individuals and not the whole group in a learning session. Individuals have different learning capabilities and so should be their curriculums.
The provisions in the article are in a summative nature and do not enumerate the various curriculums and how they should look. It is vital for readers to understand and know the different curriculum samples that exist in the learning process. The authors need to furnish their readers with more information on the is subject matter.
Poggio, T., & Smale, S. (2005). The Mathematics of Learning: Dealing With Data. 2005 International Conference on Neural Networks and Brain.
Poggio in his works of identifying information that is in data form confirms that learners often understand well when data is provided for them. The use of data is mostly seen as visual compared to mere rhetoric. Information provided in this nature captures the attention of the learners easily leading to high levels of understanding.
The provisions in the article are well presented and researched. They provide the various tenets that are needed for educators when dealing with their learners. They for example show that the use of data arouses the desire of a learner to read more on their various fields of study.
Santagata, R. (2008). Designing Video-Based Professional Development for Mathematics Teachers in Low-Performing Schools. Journal of Teacher Education.
Santagata on his part sees video based information as essential to learners. He thinks that video provides visual representations that cannot be forgotten by learners easily. The use of video often incorporates both data and explanations which are essential in the learning process.
The sentiments of Santagana are well researched and presented. They form the basis for learning in institutions where different capabilities co-exist. The information is given can assist educators to make changes in their teaching modalities to ensure success in their careers.
Shea, P., Li, C., & Swan, K. (2005). Developing learning community in online asynchronous college courses: The role of teaching presence. na, na, 59-82. Retrieved from http://sloanconsortium.org/system/files/v9n4_shea.pdf
Shea and Swan purport that learning communities are essential in the learning process. According to them when communities exist in the online learning platform they are usually helpful when educators are not around. The communities can also form forums which ensure the development of all their members.
The information provided is essential as it indicates the importance of working together while learning. The information is presented in an easy to understand version which can be used by both adult and young learners. They information is also well researched and timely to the online learning processes.
Wagner, N., Hassanein, K., & Head, M. (2008). Who is responsible for e-learning success in higher education? A stakeholdersʼ analysis. Educational Technology and Society, 11(3), 26-36.
The authors cover the issues of e-learning and its success in higher education. They are in dilemma of the people who should take charge of e-learning in various institutions. They conclude their discussion by citing the students as the sole beneficiaries and also those who are responsible for their success.
The information gives learners a chance to assess their capabilities and aim for success without making considerations of their educators. It is well researched and timely to students as they are given tips on how to succeed while making use of e-learning in their classrooms. The authors present their information in a coherent and straight manner.

References
Armstrong, A., & Foley , P. (2003). Foundations for a learning organization: organization learning mechanisms. The Learning Organization.
Aviram, A., Ronen, Y., Somekh, S., Winer, A., & Sarid, A. (2008). Self-Regulated Personalized Learning (SRPL): Developing iClass’s pedagogical model. eLearning Papers, 9(July), 1-17. Retrieved from www.elearningpapers.eu
Bhuasiri, W., Xaymoungkhoun, O., Zo, H., Rho, J. J., & Ciganek, A. P. (2012). Critical success factors for e-learning in developing countries: A comparative analysis between ICT experts and faculty. Computers and Education, 58(2), 843-855.
Bosuwon, T., & Woodrow, L. (2009). Developing a Problem-Based Course Based on Needs Analysis to Enhance English Reading Ability of Thai Undergraduate Students. RELC Journal.
Cook, D. A., & Dupras, D. M. (2004). A practical guide to developing effective web-based learning. Journal of general internal medicine, 19(6), 698-707.
Ghirardini, B. (2011). E-learning methodologies: A guide for designing and developing e-learning courses. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 138. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/docrep/015/i2516e/i2516e.pdf
Grant, J. (2002). Learning needs assessment: assessing the need. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 324(7330), 156-159.
Hong, C. M., Chen, C. M., Chang, M. H., & Chen, S. C. (2007). Intelligent web-based tutoring system with personalized learning path guidance. Proceedings – The 7th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, ICALT 2007 (pp. 512-516).
Moore, J. L., Dickson-Deane, C., & Galyen, K. (2011). e-Learning, online learning, and distance learning environments: Are they the same? The Internet and Higher Education.
Myers, J., & Pellino, T. A. (2009). Developing new ways to address learning needs of adult abdominal organ transplant recipients. Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), 19(2), 160-166.
OʼShea, C., & Spike, N. (2005). Learning needs analysis–developing a new tool for general practice training. Australian family physician, 34 Suppl 1, 41-43.
Poggio, T., & Smale, S. (2005). The Mathematics of Learning: Dealing With Data. 2005 International Conference on Neural Networks and Brain.
Santagata, R. (2008). Designing Video-Based Professional Development for Mathematics Teachers in Low-Performing Schools. Journal of Teacher Education.
Shea, P., Li, C., & Swan, K. (2005). Developing learning community in online asynchronous college courses: The role of teaching presence. na, na, 59-82. Retrieved from http://sloanconsortium.org/system/files/v9n4_shea.pdf
Wagner, N., Hassanein, K., & Head, M. (2008). Who is responsible for e-learning success in higher education? A stakeholdersʼ analysis. Educational Technology and Society, 11(3), 26-36.